Category Archives: Microsoft Office 2016

Accessibility Features in Outlook

This article describes assistive technology features that you can turn on when using Outlook to make reading and writing email easier. For guidelines on how to create e-mails that are accessible to others, see Creating Accessible Emails in Outlook.

Outlook is part of Office 365/Microsoft 365, which all current students and employees can access online through a web browser and install on personal devices. The desktop version is installed on all college-owned computers.


Contents


Use Keyboard Shortcuts

You can use key combinations to navigate in Outlook and perform common menu operations such as opening, creating, replying to, forwarding and sending messages; creating meetings and tasks; switching between the Calendar, Mail and Tasks windows, and moving messages to folders. Keyboard shortcuts can be easier than using a mouse or trackpad for individuals with mobility or vision disabilities. Learning keyboard shortcuts for common tasks can help all user work more efficiently.

See Microsoft’s Keyboard shortcuts in Outlook for the most up-to-date information on shortcuts available in Outlook online (Office365) and the Outlook for Windows, Mac and iOS.


Dark Mode (Office 365 Only)

  1. Open Outlook in your browser and log in.
  2. Click Settings
  3. Toggle Dark Mode on.
  4. While Dark Mode is on you can use the Sun(View with light background) Moon (view with dark background) icons in the tool bar beneath a message to see only text for that message in a light background.

See Dark Mode in Outlook for details.


Read E-Mail in Immersive Reader

With both the web version and Outlook desktop apps you can read email in Microsoft’s Immersive Reader to take advantage of accessibility features such as font and spacing adjustments, line focus, and color overlays.

In the desktop version (recommended):

  • Open the Immersive Reader within the Reading Pane by clicking View > Immersive Reader.
  • Any email you highlight in your mailbox will now open in Immersive Reader.

In the web/Microsoft 365 version of Outlook:

  • You can only open one email at a time in Immersive Reader.
  • With the Mail tab open, click (ellipsis) in the top menu bar, and choose Show in immersive reader.
  • Click the arrow in the top left to return to your mailbox.

See Open Immersive Reader for Outlook for instructions on using its features.

 


Listen to Your E-Mail

The Read Aloud feature of Immersive Reader can also read email messages to you using text-to-speech. See Listen to Your Outlook Email Messages with Read Aloud.


Text Prediction (Office 365 only)

Outlook can speed or ease typing by predicting the next word or phrase as you type — press Tab or the right arrow to accept it’s suggestions, keep typing to ignore them. See Editor text predictions for more information, including how disable or re-enable this feature on and off.


Request Accessible Content (Office 365)

Turn this setting on at your account level to show other Bryn Mawr Outlook users a notice that “A recipient has requested accessible content” when they send email to you or copy you on an email. Depending the email composer’s settings, this may also turn on accessibility checking for that message, alerting them to issues like a lack of alternative text or problematic font settings..

  1. Log in to your Bryn Mawr webmail.
  2. Click (Settings) in the top left corner.
  3. Start typing “accessible content” in the search bar of the settings pane, then choose that option when it pops up.
  4. Check the Ask users to send accessible content box
  5. Close the settings window.

Support for Screen Reader Users

See Microsoft’s Screen Reader Support for Outlook provides detailed, device-specific information on how to navigate, perform tasks, and read content in Outlook when using a screen reader.

Create Accessible E-Mails in Outlook

Following the guidelines below helps ensure that all recipients will be able to read e-mails you send. For information on features that can make it easier for you to read and write e-mail when using Outlook, please see Accessibility Features in Outlook.

  1. Add Alt Text to Images
  2. Add Meaningful Hyperlinks
  3. Use Accessible Font Formatting
  4. Avoid Animated GIFs
  5. Use the Accessibility Checker

For more detailed information, see Microsoft documentation for making email accessible.

Prefer video? See Microsoft video tutorials on creating accessible content in Outlook.


1. Add Alt Text to Images

Alt text (or alternative text) provides a concise description of an image for screen reader users. The alt text will also appear in place of an image when the image cannot be loaded or rendered properly.

On a Windows device and in Outlook online
  1. In an email draft, click an image in the message body.
  2. To display the formatting toolbar, click Show Formatting Options
  3. In the toolbar, click Add alternate text or image
  4. Type a description for the image and click OK
On a macOS computer
  1. In an email draft, click an image in the message body
  2. In the menu bar at the top of the screen click Format
  3. From the Format menu, click Edit Alt Text…
  4. Type a description for the image and close the Alt text menu.
On a mobile device
  1. In an email draft, double tap an image. This opens the context menu.
  2. Tap Alt Text
  3. Type a description for the image and press OK or SAVE.

 

3. Use Accessible Font Formatting

Color should not the only means of conveying information.
People who are colorblind may not be able to distinguish text in different colors. Add other formatting (such as bold or italics) when using color to call out or distinguish text instead of relying only on color.

There is sufficient contrast between text and background colors.
For greatest accessibility, use the default font color setting — Automatic, as this will work best when recipients are using high contrast or dark viewing modes to read email. If you do customize the color, check that the contrast between the text and the background meets Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0.

Use sans serif fonts that are at least 11pt or larger.
Sans serif fonts and larger font sizes are easier for people with dyslexia or low vision to read.


 

4. Avoid Animated GIFs

Blinking or flashing content can trigger seizures for individuals with photosensitive seizure disorders. Animated GIFs can be accessible if the animation is no longer than five seconds and only plays once or if viewers manually start and stop it. They are most problematic when the animation loops continuously. If you cannot guarantee an animation won’t loop, it is safest to leave it out or replace it with a still image.


 

5. Use the Accessibility Checker

Microsoft’s Accessibility Checker can check your email drafts for certain issues that could cause access problems and suggest ways to fix them. See Microsoft’s Accessibility Checker documentation for details about what it does and doesn’t check, troubleshooting information, and advice on interpreting results and fixing issues.

Note: The Accessibility Checker is not available in Office apps for iOS or Android devices.

Check an email before sending it:

In Outlook online (Office 365)
  1. Click (More options) in menu bar above the email.
  2. Choose Check for accessibility issues.

  1. Results will appear in a Accessibility pane to the right of your draft. If issues are found, click Fix This to access the settings you need to fix them.
In Outlook for MacOS
  1. Click the Options ribbon, then Check Accessibility.

Screenshot of UI in Outlook to open Accessibility Checker

  1. Results will appear in a pane to the right of your draft. If issues are found, click Fix This for more information and to access the settings you need to fix them.
In Outlook for Windows
  1. Click Check Accessibility in the Message or Review ribbon.

  1. Results will appear in a pane to the right of your draft. If issues are found, click Fix This for more information and to access the settings you need to fix them.

(Windows only) Run Accessibility Checker while you write and display warnings as MailTips:

  1. Click File
  2. Select Options in the bottom of the right sidebar.
  3. Click Ease of Access

  1. Change the Accessibility checker options to:
    • Show me accessibility warnings while I work — the Accessibility Checker always runs
    • Show me accessibility options when — the Accessibility Checker runs only when the conditions you select are met.
Note: In Outlook for Mac, the Accessibility Checker always runs in the background if you are drafting an email to one or more recipients who prefers accessible content.

 

Accessiblity Features in Office365: Immersive Reader

Table of Contents

  • What is Immersive Reader?
  • How to Open Immersive Reader
  • Features
  • Text Preferences
  • Grammar Options
  • Reading Preferences
  • Voice Settings
  • Questions?

What is Immersive Reader?

Immersive Reader is an inbuilt feature now available among a variety of Microsoft platforms. Immersive Reader provides a variety of tools to support reading and comprehension. Without altering the original text, Immersive Reader allows you to change how the text appears to you so you can read it more comfortably. Microsoft continues to expand its list of platforms on which Immersive Reader is offered and updating their Immersive Reader site with the most current information.

Learn how to access Immersive Reader in Outlook

Learn how to access Immersive Reader in Teams, Word, Edge, PowerPoint, and Forms.

Features

When you open Immersive Reader your screen will transform to fill the screen. On the upper right corner, you will see icons for Text Preferences, Grammar Options, and Reading Preferences.

Text Preference

In this panel of the menu, you can make changes to the way text appears on your screen.

  • Text Size: Move the slider to change the text size.
  • Increase Spacing: Toggle the switch to increase both the spacing between letters and the spacing between lines of text.
  • Font: Choose whichever font is easier for you to read (options include Calibri, Sitka, or Comic Sans).
  • Theme: Choose the background color that is most comfortable for you. To see more options, click More colors.
  • Show Source Formatting: Toggle this switch to view the text with or without its original formatting.

Image of the text preferences menu in Immersive Reader

Grammar Options:

  • Syllables: Toggle this switch to have each word broken up into syllables.
  • Parts of Speech: With this tool, you can identify words by their part of speech. Toggle on which parts of speech you would like to be identified. The parts of speech you have selected will appear in a different color now. If you would like to change the color of each part of speech, click (the drop-down menu) before each part of speech on the menu and select your preferred color.

Image of grammar options menu in Immersive Reader

Reading Preferences:

  • Line Focus: Turning this on will provide screen masking. You can select to have one line, three lines, or five lines of text shown at a time.
  • Picture Dictionary: When this feature is toggled on, you can click words in your text to show a picture depicting the word.
  • Translate: Using the drop-down menu indicating to Choose a language to select the language you would like to read the text in. Next, choose whether you would like the text to be translated by word or the entire document by toggling the corresponding toggles.
    • By word: When you click a word, a box will appear with a translation in the language of your selection.
    • Document: The entire document will be translated into the language you selected. However, the original text will still appear in its original language once you exit the Immersive Reader.

image of reading preferences in immersive reader

Voice Settings:

To read the text aloud, click the blue arrow at the bottom middle of the Immersive Reader screen. To pause the reading, click this arrow again.

To change the voice settings, click the Voice Settings button.

  • Voice Speed: Move the slider to make the reading speed faster or slower.
  • Voice Selection: Select either a female or male voice to read your text aloud.

image of voice settings menu in Immersive Reader

Questions?

If you have any additional questions or problems, don’t hesitate to reach out to the Help Desk!

Phone: 610-526-7440
Email: help@brynmawr.edu
Location: Canaday Library 1st Floor

Turning on Subtitles in PowerPoint

Table of Contents

  • Introduction to PowerPoint subtitles
  • Web
  • Windows
  • Mac
  • Best Practices
  • Questions

Introduction to PowerPoint Subtitles

PowerPoint can create automatic speech recognition (ASR) subtitles during a presentation in a variety of languages. This feature is available on the web, Windows, and Mac versions of PowerPoint.

Web

  1. Click Slide Show.
  2. Click Always Use Subtitles.  Clicking Always Use Subtitles will enable subtitles in your presentations until you choose to turn off the feature by clicking this button again.
  3. Open the subtitle menu by clicking the down arrow or “v” next to Always Use Subtitles.

Subtitle Settings in PowerPoint Online.

  1. Click Spoken Language to select the language the presenter will be speaking in. Be mindful that PowerPoint will only pick up the speech of the person who is using the computer on which the presentation is running (or a microphone connected to that computer.)
  2. Click Subtitle Language to select the language you want the subtitles to appear in. The spoken language and subtitle language selections do not need to be the same language. (If you choose a subtitle language different than the spoken language, PowerPoint will provide a computer generated translation into your chosen subtitle language.)
  3. Select where you would like the subtitles to appear in your presentation by clicking either Below Slide or Above Slide. (It is a best practice to avoid using the options Bottom (Overlaid) and Top (Overlaid) since both of these options might overlap with your presentation slide text making both your slides and captions difficult to read.)
  4. Optional: You can click Audio Settings to choose which microphone you would like to use to pick up the speech that will be subtitled. This option is automatically set to your computer’s default microphone. To choose your microphone:
    1. Click Audio Settings.
    2. Click the drop down menu under Microphone.
    3. Click on the microphone option you want to use.
    4. Click on your presentation to exit the Audio Settings menu.
    5. Click anywhere on your presentation to exit the Always Use Subtitles menu.

When you start your presentation, subtitles will begin to appear. Usually, the subtitles are delayed for a few seconds when you first start speaking.

If you would like to turn off subtitles in the middle of presenting, you can:

  • Toggle subtitles on and off by pressing the J key.
  • Click the Use Subtitles button on the toolbar below the main slide while presenting.

Windows

Always Use Subtitles checkbox in Slide Show tab

  1. Click on Slide Show.
  2. Mark the checkbox next to Always Use Subtitle.
  3. Continue at Step 4 of the Web version instructions above.

Mac

Settings for Captions and Subtitles are on the Slide Show tab in PowerPoint.

  1. Click on Slide Show.
  2. Mark the checkbox next to Always Use Subtitle Settings.
  3. Click Subtitle Settings to open the menu.
  4. Continue at Step 4 of the Web version instructions above.

Best Practices

To ensure the best quality subtitles:

  • Speak clearly and deliberately.
  • Eliminate background noise.
  • Ensure a good internet connection.

Questions?

If you have any additional questions or problems, don’t hesitate to reach out to the Help Desk!

Phone: 610-526-7440
Email: help@brynmawr.edu
Location: Canaday Library 1st Floor

Create Accessible Slides in PowerPoint

Microsoft PowerPoint creates slide show presentations that convey information with a combination of text, images, charts, and tables. Although slide shows are designed to be highly visual, following these accessibility guidelines will ensure that everyone, including those who use use assistive technologies such as screen readers and text-to-Braille devices, can experience and understand the content of your slides.

  1. Choose an Accessible Theme
  2. Use Built-in Slide Layouts
  3. Use Unique Slide Titles
  4. Use Meaningful Hyperlink Text
  5. Use Tables Wisely
  6. Add Alt Text for Images and Charts
  7. Use the Accessibility Checker

For more in-depth information, see Microsoft’s documentation on making PowerPoint presentations accessible.

Note: If you create a PDF copy of your slides to share, use File > Save as Adobe PDF (instead of printing to PDF) to ensure accessibility features are included. Mac users need Office 2016 or 2019 and must select the radio button Best for electronic distribution and accessibility when saving. If you have an older Mac version of Office, open the document in PowerPoint online (part of Office 365) to save it as a PDF.

1. Choose an Accessible Theme

Themes and templates can add visual interest to a presentation. Microsoft’s accessible templates use accessible color settings, contrast, and fonts and have been designed so that screen readers can more easily read the slide content

  1. Click File, then New.
  2.  In the Search for online templates and themes box, type the word “accessible” and press Enter.
  3. Select your template from the results.


2. Use Built-in Slide Layouts

The content placeholders in these built-in layouts contain invisible “tags” or labels such as “Title 1”, “Subtitle 2,” etc. that assistive technologies can use to contextualize content for readers. 

  • Click New Slide and choose a the most appropriate slide layout from the drop-down menu (e.g., Title Slide, Title and Content, etc.). Then add the appropriate content to each placeholder container.  


3. Use Unique Slide Titles

  • Use a unique, descriptive title for each slide. Individuals who use assistive technologies use slide titles to identify and locate slides.
  • If information is spread across multiple slides, add sequence markers to keep titles unique — e.g,, Agenda (1 of 2), Agenda (2 of 2).

4. Use Meaningful Hyperlink Text

Make sure any URLs you add to the document are working hyperlinks with unique “display text” labels that describe the link’s destination.

  • Assistive technologies typically read or present this display text when a link is selected, so it needs to be meaningful without the surrounding text. For example, if all of the hyperlinks in your document use “click here” as the display text, an assistive technology user won’t be able to distinguish between them.
  • Before using a URL as display text, consider a reader’s experience when hearing it read aloud. A short, meaningful URL like brynmawr.edu/LITS might be acceptable as display text, but URLs that are long or contain non-human-readable text — such as https://moodle.brynmawr.edu/course/view.php?id=642 or https://bit.ly/3kSnVB7 — are not.

To insert hyperlinks:

  1. Type the text you want to make a link.
  2. Select that text, then right-click (or control-click) on your selection and choose Link.
  3. The text you selected will be in the Text to Display box; this will appear (and be read) as the link to click on.
  4. Enter the URL that the link should point to in the Address box.
  5. If it is difficult to succinctly describe a link’s destination, you can optionally click ScreenTip and to add information that will pop-up or be read when the cursor hovers over a link.
  6. Click OK.

4. Use Tables Wisely

Some information may be easier for viewers to scan or understand if it is organized in rows and columns. To ensure your tables are accessible for individuals using assistive technologies:

  • Tag the first row of each column as column headers, by positioning you cursor inside the table, clicking Table Design and checking Header Row under Table Style Options. If you don’t like the way the header row is formatted, adjust the formatting settings manually.
  • Keep tables simple. Assistive technologies use headers and cell numbers to identify tabular text and have difficulty representing complex tables with merged or split cells.
  • Avoid blank cells. Use the appropriate null value (0, n/a, etc.) instead.
DON’T use tables for layout — that is, to align and group slide elements. Use Powerpoint’s tools for aligning and arranging objects instead.

6. Add Alt Text to Images and Charts

Alt text (alternative text) describes important images and visual elements on a slide for readers who cannot see them.

  1. Open the Alt Text panel:
    • Select an image, chart or other visual element and choose Alt Text on from its Format ribbon (e.g., Picture Format, Chart Format, etc.) OR 
    • Right-click (control-click) on the visual element and choose Edit Alt Text … from the contextual menu.
  2. Add a short description or check the Mark as decorative if a screen reader or other assistive technology can ignore the image.
  3. Select another image or close the pane.

Tips:

  • Only describe images or visual elements that convey important information. If you can remove the image without changing the viewer’s understanding of the slide content, then it is “decorative” from an accessibility standpoint.
  • Don’t repeat information about the image that is already presented in the surrounding text. Alt text is only necessary if the surrounding text doesn’t describe an image sufficiently; if it does, you can mark the image as decorative.
  • Be concise.

7. Use the Accessibility Checker

  1. Click Review in the top menu bar and choose Check Accessibility. Microsoft will display the results in the Accessibility pane on the right side of the screen.
  2. Click on each Error, Warning or Tip to see:
    • A list of all objects with this issue in your document.
    • More information about the issue and how to fix it.
  3. Click one of the objects in the list; Powerpoint will jump to the slide where it appears and highlight it.
  4. The text beneath the list explains how to fix the issue; in many cases, you can click the down arrow at the end item label in the list for shortcuts to the Recommended Actions.

Create Accessible Documents in Microsoft Word

Microsoft Word is a commonly used application among individuals with a variety of disabilities and is reasonably accessible. The text within Word documents can be read by assistive technologies such as screen readers and Braille devices. Below are the basic steps for implementing important accessibility features.

Table of Contents:

Use Headings

Use headings to help people with impaired vision understand how the document is structured. Screen reader and Braille users can jump between headings, which makes navigation much more efficient than if there are no headings.

Convert text into a heading on a Mac
  1. In the Format menu, click Style…
  2. Scroll through the Styles list and click one of the built-in Heading styles like “Heading 1” or “Heading 2”.

Screenshot of Style dialogue box on Mac

Organize headings to create an outline; use the “Heading 1” style for the main heading, and “Heading 2” for sub-headings. For additional headings within sections under “Heading 2” sub-headings, use “Heading 3”, “Heading 4”, etc.

Visit the Microsoft website for more information about creating Headers in Word.

Convert text into a heading on a PC
  1. In the Home tab, click Styles.
  2. Scroll through the Styles list and click one of the built-in Heading styles like “Heading 1” and “Heading 2”.

Screenshot of heading styles list on PC

Organize headings to create an outline; use the “Heading 1” style for the main heading, and “Heading 2” for sub-headings. For additional headings within sections under “Heading 2” sub-headings, use “Heading 3”, “Heading 4”, etc.

Visit the Microsoft website for more information about creating Headers in Word.

Use Lists

Create lists using Microsoft Word’s built-in tools for ordered (numbered) and unordered (bulleted) lists. Without these tools, the content is not actually a list, and screen reader users will have more difficulty understanding it.

Create a new ordered or unordered list

  • Select the content of your list or click where the list will begin.
  • In the Home tab, click the  down-pointing caret to the right of the ordered or unordered list icons.
  • Click a bullet or numbering style.

Screenshot of style options for an unordered (bulleted) list.

Use Purposeful Hyperlinks

  1. Use language in your document that provides relevant information about the destination of the link.
  2. Highlight that text, right click it, and then click Hyperlink.
  3. Add the URL in the Address field and click OK.

Screenshot of the Hyperlink dialogue box on a MacScreenshot of the Hyperlink dialogue box on a PC

 

Visit the Microsoft website for more information about creating accessible links.

Add Alternate Text for Images

Alternative text (or alt text) provides a description of an image for screen reader users. The alt text will also appear in place of an image when the image cannot be rendered properly.

Add alternate text for images on a Mac
  1. Right click an image and click Edit Alt Text…
  2. 2. Type information in the Description field

Screenshot of Alt Text menu on a Mac

Add alternate text for images on a PC
  1. Right click an image and click Format Picture.
  2. In the Format Picture menu, click Alt Text and type information in the Description field.

Identify Document Language

Define the document’s default language

  1. Click the Tools menu and then click Language.
  2. Click the language from the list and then click OK

Define a different language for part of the document

  1. Select the text in the different language.
  2. Click the Tools menu and then click Language
  3. Click the language from the list and then click OK
  4. Repeat for each different language in the document.

Screenshot of Language menu on a Mac

Note: Currently language settings only effect accessibility of the Word document itself. They do not survive when exported to PDF. If PDF is the final format in which you intend to distribute your document, you will need to define language in the PDF directly using Adobe Acrobat Pro.

Use Tables Wisely

Word has limitations when it comes to making tables accessible. Tables can be very difficult for screen reader users to understand unless they include markup that explicitly defines the relationships between all the parts (e.g., headers and data cells). Simple table with one row of column headers and no nested rows or columns, are easily accessible in Word. However, more complex tables (such as those with split or merged cells) can only be made accessible within HTML or Adobe PDF (accessible table markup can be added to the PDF using Adobe Acrobat Pro).

  • Break up complex tables in the document and make them into multiple simple tables and give each one a heading.

For simple tables, identify which row contains the column headers.

  1. Click on one of the cells in the row containing the column headers.
  2. Click the Table menu, then click Select, then click Row
  3. Right click the row that contains the column headers and click Table Properties
  4. In the Table Properties dialogue box, click the Row tab, and check the checkbox next to “Repeat as header row at the top of each page”
Define your table’s header row on a Mac
  1. Click on one of the cells in the table, making the Table Design tab appear.
  2. Click Table Design and check the box next to Header Row to define the table’s header row

Screenshot of Table Design tab with checked box next to Header Row on a Mac

Visit Microsoft website for more information about creating Accessible Tables.

Define your table’s header row on a PC
  1. Click the Design tab, which reveals the Table Styles Option group
  2. Check the box next to Header Row to define the table’s header row.

Screenshot of Table Design tab with checked box next to Header Row on a PC

Visit Microsoft website for more information about creating Accessible Tables.

Use the Accessibility Checker

Microsoft Office has a built-in accessibility checker which can help test the overall accessibility of the document. The checker provides Inspection Results, feedback about the importance of each item, and tips on how to repair issues.

  • Click the Tools menu and then click Check Accessibility

Screenshot of the Accessibility Checker dialogue box

Sharing Files Securely Using OneDrive

OneDrive provides an easy way to share files and folders with others:

  1. Create a “share link” for a file or folder.
  2. Email or paste the link into a web page, shared document, Moodle course, chat, etc.
  3. Other people click that link to access the file or folder.

By default, settings for share links are not secure: anyone who has access to the link will have full editing and sharing permissions for the file or folder.

However, you can customize the sharing settings and increase security by:

  • Limiting who can use a share link.
  • Limiting how long a share link works.
  • Requiring a password for access.
  • Giving recipients view-only access with the link.

Create a Share Link with Secure Settings

  1. Upload or create a file or folder in OneDrive.
  2. Hover over it and click the (share).
  3. Click the sharing settings (outlined in red in the image below) at the top of the Send link window to customize them.

  1. In the Link Settings window (shown below), under “Who would you like this link to work for?” choose:
    • Anyone with the link (least secure): if you share this link with someone and they share forward it to others, everyone will be able to access the file or folder.
    • People in your organization with the link: limits access to current Bryn Mawr students and employees, users must log into their Bryn Mawr College e-mail/Office365 account to open the file or folder.
    • People with existing access: use to create a direct link to a file or folder that only works for people it has already been shared with. For example, if you are discussing a shared document with people in a web conference and want a direct link to it that you can paste into the chat.
    • Specific people — most secure option: creates a link that only works for individuals with email addresses you specify (can be internal (brynmawr.edu) or external. You will add the email addresses after clicking Apply.

  1. Under Other settings, set additional parameters:
    • Allow editing: If checked, people who click the share link can edit files, change sharing permissions, and share with others. If you are sharing a folder, they can edit, rename, move, copy, delete, and add files in that folder. Uncheck to allow people to view files, but prevent them from making changes or sharing them.
For Word documents only: when Allow editing is checked, there is an additional option to Open in review mode only. This option turns on Track changes so that people who click the share link can add comments and suggest edits, but not alter content directly.
    • Set expiration date – specify a date when the share link stops working.
    • Set password specify a password that people need to enter before they can access the file or folder. This can increase security, but only if a) you use a strong password and b) you share the password and the link separately. If you email the link to someone, don’t include the password in an email; if you post the link on a public web page, don’t post the password, too. Have people contact you for the password and/or send it by a more secure means.
    • Block download (Office365 files only) – when turned on, people who access a file through the share link can edit it within online versions Office365 apps but cannot download it or edit it in the desktop versions.
  1. Click Apply to save your settings.
  2. If you chose to share with Specific people, give those people access by adding their names or email addresses in the To: line and clicking Send. OneDrive will send them an email with a link to the item and it will show up on their Shared with me page in OneDrive.
WARNING: Entering names or email address ONLY limits access IF sharing is set to Specific people. For all other sharing settings, adding names and email addresses to the To: line only determines who receives an email with the share link. If they forward the email, anyone in the sharing category you chose (e.g. “anyone” or “anyone at brynmawr.edu”) will be able to use the link.

Check or Change Who Can Access a File or Folder

  1. Hover over the filename, click the , and choose Manage access.
  2. On the Manage Access pane:
    • Links giving access lists any share links you’ve created for the item. Click … (More options) next to a link to edit or remove it; or Share at the top of the list to create a new one.
    • Direct Access lists the groups and individuals who have permission to access the file. Click the arrow next to a name to change a person or group’s access level (view or edit) or to remove access or click the + to add a group or person to the list.

Software for Personal Devices

The following article applies to personal devices. For College computers, see current Software Configurations and Software Center.


Before you start, you will need access to the following:

  • a Bryn Mawr College account
  • a laptop or desktop w/ internet access
Access to some of the following software is dependent on your current enrollment/employment status.

Table of Contents:

 

Remote Software

All software available in campus computer labs can be accessed remotely on personal computers. Instructions are linked below.

 

Downloadable Software

Microsoft Office
(all BMC Community Members)

Microsoft Windows
(Faculty & Staff only)


Sophos Home Antivirus
(instructions below)

Malwarebytes

ChemDraw

Kaleidagraph (Win, macOS)
(For license info: contact the Help Desk)

Mathematica

Read&Write
Sophos Home (Windows, macOS) (Click me!)
For more information, see the Sophos Home landing page.
  1. Navigate to the Sophos Home download page
  2. Enter your College email address
  3. Click Submit
  4. In the email you receive, click Create Account
  5. Enter the following information:
    First & Last Name
    Personal Email Address*
    Password
    Coupon Code (pre-filled)

    *Ensure the accuracy of your personal email
    as Coupon Codes are one-time use.
  6. Click Create Account
  7. In the email you receive, click Confirm email
  8. Login with the credentials created at Step 5
  9. Follow the prompts to download Sophos Home

 

Don’t see what you’re looking for?

Students: Need access for a course? (Click me!)

Please contact the course instructor or visit your Moodle course for access instructions.

Want access for use outside of a course? (Click me!)

Please contact the Help Desk to inquire about the specific piece of software you’d like access to.

Other discounted software is available via JourneyEd.com

 

Questions?

If you have any additional questions or problems, don’t hesitate to reach out to the Help Desk!

Phone: 610-526-7440
Email: help@brynmawr.edu
Location: Canaday Library 1st Floor


Microsoft Office: Personal Devices

The following article applies to personal devices. For Public/Lab computers, see Microsoft Office: Public/Lab Computers.


Before you start, you will need access to the following:

  • a Bryn Mawr College account
  • a personal laptop or desktop computer with internet access

Table of Contents:

 

Office365: Overview

You can install Microsoft Office on up to 5 devices simultaneously including laptops, desktops, smartphones and tablets.


*Microsoft Teams & OneDrive must be installed separately.

**For a full list of all applications offered, see All Apps.

 

Installing Microsoft Office

  1. Open Google Chrome¹ and navigate to portal.office.com
  2. If prompted, login using your College username and password
  3. Click Install Office in the top-right, select Office 365 apps
  4. To begin the installation, run the .exe or .dmg file that was downloaded
Tip: How to find a downloaded file

 

Your default download location is probably the Downloads folder, which you can find in the File Explorer app (Windows) or the Finder app (macOS).

 

  1. After the installation finishes, open any Microsoft Office application
  2. Sign-in with your College username and password to active the software suite

¹Any internet browser works, but Google Chrome will provide the experience most consistent with these instructions.

 

 

Questions?

If you have any additional questions or problems, don’t hesitate to reach out to the Help Desk!

Phone: 610-526-7440
Email: help@brynmawr.edu
Location: Canaday Library 1st Floor


 

Microsoft Office: Public/Lab Computers

The following article applies to Public/Lab computers. For personal devices, see Microsoft Office: Personal Devices.


Before you start, you will need access to the following:

  • a Bryn Mawr College account

 

Public/Lab Computers

Microsoft Office applications are pre-installed on these devices.

  1. Open the program you’d like to use
  2. Click Sign In
  3. Enter your College email and password
Sign In screen not visible? (click me!)
  1. You may instead see a yellow ribbon near the top of the application window.
  2. Click Activate
  3. Sign In with your College email and password

 

Questions?

If you have any additional questions or problems, don’t hesitate to reach out to the Help Desk!

Phone: 610-526-7440
Email: help@brynmawr.edu
Location: Canaday Library 1st Floor