Category Archives: Network Resources

Guide to Cleaning-Up the Q: Drive

Please review the following in full before beginning to clean up your Q: Drive. If you have any questions about cleaning up your Q: drive, contact the Help Desk (help@brynmawr.edu or x7440).

If you haven’t already, please review the Top 11 Tips for Cleaning-Up Your Files: http://techdocs.blogs.brynmawr.edu/6416

Purpose of the Q: Drive

The Q: drive is part of the College’s network file storage system. Similar to the S: drive, the Q: drive is used as a shared storage space, meaning that multiple people can have access to the same directories (folders). Think of it as a locked filing cabinet that multiple people can have a key for, and LITS serves as the locksmith. Unlike the S: drive, the Q: drive is designed to store data for a very specific purpose.

What Belongs on the Q: drive?

The Q: drive is designed to be a storage location for data that is either going into or coming from PeopleSoft (BiONiC). Due to the nature of the data in PeopleSoft, there is a large amount of sensitive data on the Q: drive. While certain types of sensitive data are permitted on the Q: drive, no sensitive data should continue to be stored on the Q: drive if it is no longer needed.

Also, while the Q: drive is designed to accommodate shared storage needs for a number of College departments, the available storage space is by no means infinite. Due to the finite space and the costs associated with maintaining the network storage drives, the Q: drive should only be used to store files related to its intended purpose.

Please see the Data Handling Policy and the Data Handling Storage Guidelines for more details on how the College classifies sensitive data, appropriate storage media for types of data, and more. If you have further questions about whether a file is permitted to be stored on the Q: drive, contact the Help Desk.

Cleaning-Up Your Q: Drive To-do List

Below are a few recommended tasks to complete to clean up your Q: Drive.

If you think you’d benefit from a quick brush up on how to use your operating system’s file management tools, see the section titled Tips for Using the Windows and Mac File Management Tools.

Given the shared nature of the Q: drive, it’s strongly recommended that you meet to discuss a File Clean-Up Day plan of action with the other community members who use the shared directories before deleting, transferring, or reorganizing any files. For example, moving folders without considering who has permissions might end up causing widespread access issues and other problems, leading to a laborious reconciliation process. Think of who has the key before changing the lock! If your Q: drive is complex with many users, LITS recommends reaching out to the Help Desk ( help@brynmawr.edu, x7440) to schedule a consultation on a later date.

1)      Delete files from the Q: drive that do not belong there and/or are no longer needed

Note: LITS recommends that all employees follow existing file retention policies for digital files. See the College ’s Record Retention Policy here: http://www.brynmawr.edu/humanresources/Internal/Record_Retention_List.pdf

Please consult your supervisor with any questions.

  • Delete sensitive data stored on your Q: drive that you no longer need. Simply holding onto it increases the risk that it could fall into the wrong hands
  • Target the big ones! Delete large files that are of a personal nature or are unnecessary to keep. See this video to learn how to sort files by file size: http://www.viddler.com/v/c6b4538f
  • Consider deleting older versions of files. You may not need to hold onto dozens of revisions
  • Delete duplicate files. No need to keep multiple copies of the same file on one storage location
  • Delete copied Applications (e.g. MS Office, Adobe Photoshop, any .exe file types). See this video to learn how to sort files by file type: http://www.viddler.com/v/c6b4538f

2)  Transfer files from the Q: Drive that do not belong there that you’d like to retain

If there are files that you need to remove from the Q: drive but do not want to delete, there are various options for archiving or moving your files to a different storage medium. Certain storage media are best used for more temporary storage, whereas other media are better suited for longer-term storage. Please see this Tech Doc for a list of suggestions for: https://techdocs.blogs.brynmawr.edu/files/2009/07/Protecting-Your-Data-0215.pdf

Note: Again, please remain mindful of the Data Handling Policy and Data Handling Storage Guidelines when considering storing files containing sensitive data on any storage medium

3)  Other Things to Consider While Cleaning-Up your Files

  • Be consistent about how you name your files, and follow file naming best practices. Naming your files in a consistent man- ner will improve your ability to efficiently find them later and to understand differences and commonalities among your Following file naming best practices –such as avoiding using special characters (e.g. <, >, : , ?, *) – will prevent various issues. Read more here: http://techdocs.blogs.brynmawr.edu/4952
  • Consider how you organize your folders. Does your current folder organization system work for you? How could you better organize your folders to make files easier to locate and less likely to be lost and forgotten? While there isn’t a silver bullet for folder organization, you should base your folder organization around the way you work. For example, creating folders for different months or semesters might make the most sense for your workflow, or creating a folder for each of your projects might improve your organization
  • When considering what action to take with a file, ask yourself the following questions:
    • How often will I need to use this file? If it’s unlikely that you’ll need to use a file on a recurring basis or at all in the near future, consider deleting it, archiving it, or moving it to a new folder on the Q: drive for past projects
    • Did I produce this file? During your clean-up, you may come across files that someone else had created. If you do, find out if they need the file(s) before taking action
    • Can I access this information somewhere else? If you’re storing data on your Q: drive that you can access elsewhere (e.g. BiONic, the College website), consider deleting the file, especially if it contains data of a sensitive nature
    • Should this file be archived? Certain types of files are required to be archived. Contact the Help Desk if you have questions

More Tips for Using Windows and Mac File Management Tools

LinkedIn Learning, the College’s online learning tool, has a number of helpful videos focusing on using Windows and Mac File Management Tools (File Explorer and Finder) for tasks related to cleaning-up your files. See below for the links to the courses. You can either view the entire playlist of videos or view individual videos. Clicking on a link will redirect you to the LinkedIn Learning sign in page. Please click the option to sign Read more about LinkedIn Learning here: http://lits.blogs.brynmawr.edu/5302

Guide to Cleaning-Up the H: Drive (Network Home Directory)

Please review the following in full before beginning to clean up your H: Drive (known as Network Home Directory on Macs). If you have any questions about cleaning up your H: drive, contact the Help Desk ( help@brynmawr.edu or x7440).

If you haven’t already, please review the Top 11 Tips for Cleaning-Up Your Files: http://techdocs.blogs.brynmawr.edu/6416

Purpose of the H: Drive

The H: drive is part of the College’s network file storage system. Every College community member has access to a private folder on the H: drive, providing you with a secure, long-term method for storing and accessing files. Think of it as a private storage unit for your College-related files.

For instructions on accessing the H: drive, see here: http://techdocs.blogs.brynmawr.edu/856

What Belongs on the H: drive?

While the H: drive is designed to accommodate our entire community, the available storage space is by no means infinite. Due to the finite space and the costs associated with maintaining the network storage drives, the H: drive should only be used to store files related to academics and/or College business. Files of a personal nature, such as personal videos, pictures, audio files, etc. are not permitted to be stored on the H: drive. If personal files are currently stored on your H: drive, they should be deleted or transferred to a different storage medium.

Certain types of sensitive data are not permitted on the H: Drive. Please see the Data Handling Policy and the Data Handling Stor- age Guidelines for more details. If you have further questions about whether a file is permitted to be stored on the H: drive, con- tact the Help Desk.

Cleaning-Up Your H: Drive To-do List

Below are a few recommended tasks to complete to clean up your H: Drive.

If you think you’d benefit from a quick brush up on how to use your operating system’s file management tools, see the section in this guide titled Tips for Using the Windows and Mac File Management Tools.

1)  Delete files from the H: drive that do not belong there and/or are no longer needed

Note: LITS recommends that all employees follow existing file retention policies for digital files. See the College ’s Record Retention Policy here: http://www.brynmawr.edu/humanresources/Internal/Record_Retention_List.pdf

Please consult your supervisor with any questions.

  • Target the big ones! Delete large files that are of a personal nature or are unnecessary to keep. See this video to learn how to sort files by file size: http://www.viddler.com/v/c6b4538f
  • Consider deleting older versions of files. You may not need to hold onto dozens of revisions
  • Delete duplicate files. No need to keep multiple copies of the same file on one storage
  • Delete copied Applications (e.g. MS Office, Adobe Photoshop, any .exe file types). See this video to learn how to sort files by file type: http://www.viddler.com/v/c6b4538f
  • Delete sensitive data stored on your H: drive that you no longer need. Simply holding onto it increases the risk that it could fall into the wrong hands

2)  Transfer files from the H: Drive that do not belong there that you’d like to retain

If there are files that you need to remove from the H: drive but do not want to delete, there are various options for archiving or moving your files to a different storage medium. Certain storage media are best used for more temporary storage, whereas other media are better suited for longer-term storage. Please see this Tech Doc for a list of suggestions for: https://techdocs.blogs.brynmawr.edu/files/2009/07/Protecting-Your-Data-0215.pdf

Note: Please be mindful of the Data Handling Policy and Data Handling Storage Guidelines when considering storing files containing sensitive data on any storage medium.

If you decide to transfer appropriate files from your H: drive to your College OneDrive for Business account, you may want to consider syncing your OneDrive account with your computer. This allows you to choose a location on your computer that will automatically sync with the cloud whenever changes are made (e.g. if you add, modify, or delete a file in this location on your computer, these changes will also occur within OneDrive in Office 365. The inverse is also true.) Syncing facilitates the efficient transfer of folders and individual files. See here for more details and instructions: http://techdocs.blogs.brynmawr.edu/5989

Note: Again, please remain mindful of the Data Handling Policy and Data Handling Storage Guidelines when considering storing files containing sensitive data on any storage medium.

A reminder for graduating seniors: Access to your H: drive will end 90 days after graduation. Be sure to move any files you wish to save before then. See more about access changes for graduating students here: http://techdocs.blogs.brynmawr.edu/4833

3)  Other Things to Consider While Cleaning-Up Your Files

  • Be consistent about how you name your files, and follow file naming best practices. Naming your files in a consistent man- ner will improve your ability to efficiently find them later and to understand differences and commonalities among your Following file naming best practices –such as avoiding using special characters (e.g. <, >, : , ?, *) — will prevent various issues. Read more here: http://techdocs.blogs.brynmawr.edu/4952
  • Consider how you organize your folders. Does your current folder organization system work for you? How could you better organize your folders to make files easier to locate and less likely to be lost and forgotten? While there isn’t a silver bullet for folder organization, you should base your folder organization around the way you work. For example, creating folders for different months or semesters might make the most sense for your workflow, or creating a folder for each of your projects might improve your organization
  • When considering what action to take with a file, ask yourself the following questions:
    • How often will I need to use this file? If it’s unlikely that you’ll need to use a file on a recurring basis or at all in the near future, consider deleting it, archiving it, or moving it to a new folder on the H: drive for past projects
    • Did I produce this file? This is less applicable to the H: drive than shared network drives, but during your clean-up, you may come across files that someone else had created. If you do, find out if they need the file(s) before taking action
    • Can I access this information somewhere else? If you’re storing data on your H: drive that you can access elsewhere (e.g. BiONic, the College website), consider deleting the file, especially if it contains data of a sensitive nature
    • Should this file be archived? Certain types of files are required to be archived. Contact the Help Desk if you have questions

More Tips for Using Windows and Mac File Management Tools

LinkedIn Learning, the College’s online learning tool, has a number of helpful videos focusing on using Windows and Mac File Management Tools (File Explorer and Finder) for tasks related to cleaning-up your files. See below for the links to the courses. You can either view the entire playlist of videos or view individual videos. Clicking on a link will redirect you to the LinkedIn Learning sign in page. Please click the option to sign Read more about LinkedIn Learning here: http://lits.blogs.brynmawr.edu/5302

Guide to Cleaning-Up the S: Drive (Network Storage Directory)

Please review the following in full before beginning to clean up your S: Drive, also known as Network Storage Directory on Macs. If you have any questions about cleaning-up your S: drive, contact the Help Desk ( help@brynmawr.edu or x7440).

If you haven’t already, please review the Top 11 Tips for Cleaning-Up Your Files: http://techdocs.blogs.brynmawr.edu/6416

Purpose of the S: Drive

Similar to the H: drive, the S: drive is part of the College’s network file storage system. Unlike the H: drive, the S: drive is used as a shared storage space, meaning that multiple people can have access to the same directories (folders). Think of it as a locked filing cabinet that multiple people can have a key for, and LITS serves as the locksmith.

What Belongs on the S: drive?

While the S: drive is designed to accommodate shared storage needs for a variety of College constituencies, the available storage space is by no means infinite. Due to the finite space and the costs associated with maintaining the network storage drives, the S: drive should only be used to store files related to academics and/or College business. Files of a personal nature, such as personal videos, pictures, audio files, etc. are not permitted to be stored on the S: drive. If personal files are currently stored on your S:drive, they should be deleted or transferred to a different storage medium.

Certain types of sensitive data are not permitted on the S: Drive. Please see the Data Handling Policy and the Data Handling Storage Guidelines for more details. If you have further questions about whether a file is permitted to be stored on the S: drive, contact the Help Desk.

Cleaning-Up Your S: Drive To-do List

Given the shared nature of the S: drive, it’s strongly recommended that you meet to discuss a plan of action with the other community members who use the shared directories before deleting, transferring, or reorganizing any files. For example, moving folders without considering who has permissions might end up causing widespread access issues and other problems, leading to a laborious reconciliation process. Think of who has the key before changing the lock! If your S: drive is complex with many users, LITS recommends reaching out to the Help Desk (help@brynmawr.edu, x7440) to schedule a consultation on a later date.

If you think you’d benefit from a quick brush up on how to use your operating system’s file management tools, see the section in this guide titled Tips for Using the Windows and Mac File Management Tools.

1)  Delete files from the S: drive that do not belong there and/or are no longer needed

Note: LITS recommends that all employees follow existing file retention policies for digital files. See the College ’s Record Retention Policy here: http://www.brynmawr.edu/humanresources/Internal/Record_Retention_List.pdf

Please consult your supervisor with any questions.

  • Target the big ones! Delete large files that are of a personal nature or are unnecessary to keep. See this video to learn how to sort files by file size: http://www.viddler.com/v/c6b4538f
  • Consider deleting older versions of files. You may not need to hold onto dozens of revisions
  • Delete duplicate files. No need to keep multiple copies of the same file on one storage
  • Delete copied Applications (e.g. MS Office, Adobe Photoshop, any .exe file types). See this video to learn how to sort files by file type: http://www.viddler.com/v/c6b4538f
  • Delete sensitive data stored on your S: drive that you no longer need. Simply holding onto it increases the risk that it could fall into the wrong hands

2)  Transfer files from the S: Drive that do not belong there that you’d like to retain

If there are files that you need to remove from the S: drive but do not want to delete, there are various options for archiving or moving your files to a different storage medium. Certain storage media are best used for more temporary storage, whereas other media are better suited for longer-term storage. Please see this Tech Doc for a list of suggestions for: https://techdocs.blogs.brynmawr.edu/files/2009/07/Protecting-Your-Data-0215.pdf

Note: Again, please remain mindful of the Data Handling Policy and Data Handling Storage Guidelines when considering storing files containing sensitive data on any storage medium

3)  Other Things to Consider While Cleaning-Up Your Files

  • Be consistent about how you name your files, and follow file naming best practices. Naming your files in a consistent man- ner will improve your ability to efficiently find them later and to understand differences and commonalities among your Following file naming best practices –such as avoiding using special characters (e.g. <, >, : , ?, *) — will prevent various issues. Read more here: http://techdocs.blogs.brynmawr.edu/4952
  • Consider how you organize your folders. Does your current folder organization system work for you? How could you better organize your folders to make files easier to locate and less likely to be lost and forgotten? While there isn’t a silver bullet for folder organization, you should base your folder organization around the way you work. For example, creating folders for different months or semesters might make the most sense for your workflow, or creating a folder for each of your projects might improve your organization
  • When considering what action to take with a file, ask yourself the following questions:
    • How often will I need to use this file? If it’s unlikely that you’ll need to use a file on a recurring basis or at all in the near future, consider deleting it, archiving it, or moving it to a new folder on the S: drive for past projects
    • Did I produce this file? During your clean-up, you may come across files that someone else had created. If you do, find out if they need the file(s) before taking action
    • Can I access this information somewhere else? If you’re storing data on your S: drive that you can access elsewhere (e.g. BiONic, the College website), consider deleting the file, especially if it contains data of a sensitive nature
    • Should this file be archived? Certain types of files are required to be archived. Contact the Help Desk if you have questions

More Tips for Using Windows and Mac File Management Tools

LinkedIn Learning, the College’s online learning tool, has a number of helpful videos focusing on using Windows and Mac File Management Tools (File Explorer and Finder) for tasks related to cleaning-up your files. See below for the links to the courses. You can either view the entire playlist of videos or view individual videos. Clicking on a link will redirect you to the LinkedIn Learning sign in page. Please click the option to sign Read more about LinkedIn Learning here: http://lits.blogs.brynmawr.edu/5302

Top 11 Tips for Cleaning-Up Your Files

Please review the following tips before beginning to clean up your files. If you have any questions about cleaning up your files, contact the Help Desk (help@brynmawr.edu or x7440).

See bottom of this post for printable version.

  1. Set small goals. Saying that you’re going to clean your entire house is a stress-inducing, ambiguous objective, but setting out to vacuum a room is a discrete, attainable goal. Set smaller goals to help you focus and accomplish what’s most important to you.
  2. Take it slow! Don’t try to move/delete too many files at once. You’ll reduce the risk of unintentionally deleting files you need.
  3. Delete only files that you’re absolutely sure you don’t need from network storage drives . While the network storage drives are routinely backed up, these backups are meant for large-scale disasters, not individual cases of accidental data loss. Individual files are very difficult, if not impossible, to retrieve.
  4. Copy/paste, then delete. Continuing with the theme of slow and steady, if you are moving files from one location to another, LITS recommends that you first copy/paste the files to the new location, and then delete them from the original location. This helps to ensure the safety of your files in case anything goes wrong during the data transfer.
  5. Work from the bottom of your folder hierarchy. You wouldn’t toss out your entire filing cabinet if you thought there might be files worth saving in the folders within! “Drill down” to the lowest folder level you have to allow you to make more granular decisions about deleting/moving/archiving your files.
  6. Think twice, delete once. Exercise thoughtfulness and patience throughout your cleaning session. Ensuring the integrity and well-being of your files is a top priority when cleaning up your files; rushing through the clean-up process can have adverse effects. First ask yourself, “Do I need to keep this file?”, and then, “Does this file belong on the H:/C:/S: drive?”
  7. Create a “to delete” folder if you’re not 100% sure. Not completely confident that you won’t need something later? Create a folder for files you’d like to hang on to for a bit longer and move them to this location during your clean-up. Check back after a set period of time (e.g. 2 weeks). If you haven’t needed the files, delete them!
  8. PII? Kiss it goodbye! Delete personally identifiable information and other sensitive data that you no longer need. Simply holding onto it increases the risk that it could fall into the wrong hands.
  9. Understand file size basics and focus on the biggest culprits of space hogging. 25 old Word documents might take up a trivial 2 Megabytes of storage space on the network storage drive. However, 2 video files might be taking up a whopping 25 Gigabytes of space (which is 25,000 Megabytes!). Start your clean-up by identifying large files that you don’t need or that don’t belong on the network storage drives. Learn how to sort by file size here: http://www.viddler.com/v/c6b4538f. Learn more about the difference between megabytes and gigabytes here: http://techdocs.blogs.brynmawr.edu/5523
  10. Know that backing up files and archiving them are not the same. Creating a backup means that you are creating an identical copy of a file and placing it in a different, but accessible, location in case of data loss. Archiving means you are removing the item from its original location and placing it elsewhere for long-term storage.
  11. Work towards identifying files with unknown owners (on the S: Drive). If you find a file and you’re not certain of who should own it, write down the name and location, and then discuss it with your team before taking further action.
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Share Large Files in OneDrive and Link on Moodle

Whether you’d like to share a film clip, an outside link, or upload a class recording, there are several ways to add/share video on Moodle. In this Tech Doc, you’ll find the most-common ways to share video on Moodle based on where the video is originally stored/hosted.

The first step to sharing video stored on your computer/device is to upload it to a platform that offers sufficient storage space for large video files. For the Bryn Mawr community, the easiest way to do this is by uploading your video to OneDrive or Panopto. This article provides instructions for uploading your file to OneDrive (see this article for uploading videos to Panopto and linking on Moodle).

Uploading a video to OneDrive

  1. On your browser, visit webmail.brynmawr.edu and log into your account.
  2. On the blue toolbar near the top of your browser, navigate to your Office 365 apps by clicking on the Apps icon.
  3. From the menu that appears, choose OneDrive. A new page will appear showing your OneDrive page.
  4. On this new page, locate and click Upload button near the blue toolbar. From the dropdown menu, select Files.
  5. A new window will appear showing files stored on your device. Find the video file you wish to upload and click Open.
  6. When the video has been uploaded, you will see a box indicating that the upload is complete and asking you to share a link to your file. Use the option Share Link to create a link for your video.
  7. A small window will appear in which you can set your sharing preferences. Click on Anyone with the link can edit to start changing your preferences.
  8. In the Link Settings window, set your sharing preferences. If you’re sharing this link with anyone outside the Bryn Mawr community (such as Haverford students), click on Anyone with the link.
  9. In Other Settings, choose whether the group you selected above can edit the document by checking/unchecking the box Allow Editing. This box is checked by default, so if you do not want users to edit the document, you will need to uncheck the box.

  10. When you’re finished setting up your preferences, click Apply.
  11. From the window that appears next, click on the icon Copy Link. Yet another new window will appear showing you the URL and indicating that you have copied the link. You can click on Copy Link once again if you need to get the link back on your clipboard.

After you’ve uploaded your video to OneDrive and created a shareable link, navigate to Moodle to share the video:

  1. Turn editing on in your course (use the button located at the top right of your course’s main page).
  2. Locate where you would like to place the link and select +Add an activity or resource.

  3. From the menu that comes up, choose the URL activity and then click Add.
  4. In the new window that appears, you will be able to give your URL a Name. The name is the text that will be displayed linking to your video. For example, you can title your link “Film clip for Week 1.”
  5. Next, paste your link into the External URL.
  6. Click Save and return to course. Your video is now available through this link to all users on your Moodle course page.
  7. To confirm your link is working correctly, open your link in a new incognito tab or browser.

 

Mapping your BMC Network Drives

Mapping your network drives allows you to access files stored on your H: or departmental files stored on the S: from your computer.


Before you start, you will need access to the following:

  • a laptop or desktop computer with internet access
  • Off-campus: a connection to the Pulse Secure VPN

 

Choosing a Network Drive

Note: You can map both drives, simply follow the instructions below twice.

  • Home Drive (H:)
  • Departmental Drives (S:)

 

Step-by-Step Instructions

Click the drop-down below for the Operating System that applies to you.

Windows (Click me!)
  1. Press thekey on your keyboard
  2. Search for and open This PC
  3. At the top, click ComputerMap Network Drive
  4. For “Drive”, select either H: or S:
  5. For “Folder”, enter the path of the directory you want:
    Home Drive (H:)
    \\home.brynmawr.edu\home\username
    Departmental Drives (S:)
    \\storage.brynmawr.edu\storage
  6. Un-check Reconnect at sign-in
  7. Check Connect using different credentials
  8. Click Finish
  9. When prompted, enter your College username and password
    “Remember my credentials” will only work until you change your password
  10. Click OK
  11. In a few seconds, your mapped drive will open in a new window
MacOS (Click me!)
  1. Open Finder
  2. At the top, click Go Connect to Server
  3. For “Server Address”, enter the path of the directory you want:
    Home Drive (H:)
    smb://home.brynmawr.edu/home/username
    Departmental Drives (S:)
    smb://storage.brynmawr.edu/storage
  4. Click the to add this address to your favorites
  5. Click Connect
  6. When prompted, select Registered User and enter your College username and password
  7. In a few seconds, your mapped drive will open in a new window

 

Questions?

If you have any additional questions or problems, don’t hesitate to reach out to the Help Desk!

Phone: 610-526-7440
Email: help@brynmawr.edu
Location: Canaday Library 1st Floor


Using the VPN for Off-Campus Access

Bryn Mawr College uses a VPN (Virtual Private Network) to allow users to access their Home directory and other network drives when off campus. Connecting to the VPN simulates being connected to the on-campus network, so users can work off-campus without missing out on any important data or resources. The app used to connect to the VPN is called Pulse Secure.

If you have any questions about the following guide, please contact the Help Desk at help@brynmawr.edu or by calling +1 610-526-7440.

Please Note:You cannot use the VPN and EZProxy (for access to library resources) at the same time. Additionally, you cannot use the VPN to access any region-locked content or bypass internet censorship regulations.
Jump to a section:

 

Using the VPN with College computers (Windows)

College-provided Windows computers already have the Pulse Secure app installed on them. Follow the steps below to configure the app to use the College’s VPN.

Step 1

Open Pulse Secure. The easiest way is to type “pulse secure” into the search bar in the bottom left corner of your screen, then click on the app when it appears in the search results.

The search bar can be accessed by pressing the Windows key on your keyboard.

  1. If the Pulse Secure App does NOT appear in the search results, please consult the last section of this post: Using the VPN with personal Windows computers.

Step 2

When Pulse Secure opens, it might ask you to sign in. Sign in as you would for webmail, with your full College email and password. Authenticate with Duo.

Step 3

If you see an entry named ingress.brynmawr.edu in Pulse Secure, in the space under Connections, follow this step. Otherwise, skip to Step 4. You can switch the connection’s status by clicking connect or disconnect on the right-hand side, and you can see whether it is connected or disconnected by looking under the connection name.

Step 4

If there is no entry under Connections, you need to add a connection. To do this, click the + button to the right of Connections. The Add Connection window will open. Enter the following information into the fields:

Type: Policy Secure (UAC) or Connect Secure (VPN)
Name: (SA) ingress.brynmawr.edu (or any name you want)
Address: ingress.brynmawr.edu

Click Connect, then sign in with your College email and password if prompted.

 

Using the VPN with personal computers (Windows)

Step 1

In a web browser (we recommend Google Chrome for this process), go to https://ingress.brynmawr.edu. Log in with your College username and password.

Step 2

After logging in, you’ll see the Pulse Secure homepage, with the headers “Web Bookmarks,” “Files,” and “Client Application
Sessions.” Under the Client Application Sessions header, click the Start button to the right of Pulse Secure.

Step 3

Click Download to download the Application Launcher, then open the file to install it. To do so, if you’re using Google Chrome, click on the file that appears in the left of the pop-up banner at the bottom of the window. If you’re using a different browser and are prompted by a pop-up window, click Open or Run. Otherwise, open the downloaded PulseSecureAppLauncher file from the Downloads folder in File Explorer.

Step 4

Return to your web browser. Click on the blue link that looks like “HERE,” as indicated below. If you don’t see that link and are instead on the homepage again, instead simply click Start to the right of Pulse Secure again, like you did to begin this process.

  1. You will be prompted by your browser to open the Pulse Secure Launcher App. In Google Chrome, click Open PulseApplicationLauncher.

Step 5

Next, you will be asked if you want to connect ingress.brynmawr.edu. To continue, click Yes, then click Always in the next window.

If you see a pop up asking you to allow Duo to make changes to your computer, click Yes. You may see this pop-up multiple times; click Yes each time.

Step 6

If you stop seeing progress or pop-ups, type “pulse secure” into the search bar in the bottom left corner of your screen.

The search bar can be accessed by pressing the Windows key on your keyboard.

If you see Pulse Secure — App, as seen in the following image, the Pulse Secure app has successfully installed. You can skip to Step 7.

If you don’t see that result, return to your web browser. In the ingress.brynmawr.edu homepage, click Start to the right of Pulse Secure once again. You will now have to repeat Step 5, but you will then see a download progress bar. When it completes, continue to the next step.

Step 7

Once the download completes, your computer will connect to the VPN through this program. When the VPN is running, you will see an icon which looks like a small S near your computer’s clock or in the App Tray. If you are connected, there will be a green dot or arrow on the icon as well.

 

 

Using the VPN with Apple computers (College-provided and personal)

Step 1

In a web browser (we recommend Google Chrome for this process), go to https://ingress.brynmawr.edu. Log in with your College username and password.

Step 2

After logging in, you’ll see the Pulse Secure homepage, with the headers “Web Bookmarks,” “Files,” and “Client Application Sessions.” Under the Client Application Sessions header, click the Start button to the right of Pulse Secure.

If a prompt to accept a security certificate appears, accept the certificate. This may happen the first time you connect.

Step 3

  • Click Download to download the Application Launcher, then open the file to install it.
  • To do so, if you’re using Google Chrome, click on the file that appears in the left of the pop-up banner at the bottom of the window. (See the image below.)
  • If prompted by a pop-up window, click Open or Run. Otherwise, open the PulseSecureAppLauncher file from the Downloads folder in Finder.

Step 4

A window named PulseSecureAppLauncher.9.#.#.#### will open (where # is a version number as shown in the image below). In it, double click the PulseSecureAppLauncher.mpkg file to install the App Launcher.

A white-silver drive that looks similar to the Macintosh HD icon. It has the same name as the window above.If that window doesn’t open, go to your desktop. You should see an icon that looks like the image to the right, with the same name: PulseSecureAppLauncher.9.#.#.####. Double click on it to open the window and proceed.

Step 5

A new window named Install Pulse Secure Application Launcher will open. In the bottom right, click Continue then Install to begin the installation. When the installation is complete, click Close.

  • When you click Close, the window will ask if you want to move the files you just clicked on to Trash. You won’t need those files anymore, so click Move to Trash.

Step 6

Return to your web browser. Click on the blue link that looks like “HERE,” as indicated below. If you don’t see that link and see the homepage again, instead simply click Start to the right of Pulse Secure again, like you did to begin this process.

Step 7

  1. You will be prompted by your browser to open the Pulse Secure Launcher App. In Google Chrome, click Open PulseApplicationLauncher.

  1. If you see a window that says “You are opening the application “PulseApplicationLauncher” for the first time. Are you sure you want to open this application?” Click Open.
  2. In the next window, when asked “Do you want to allow Pulse Secure to contact the server…?” Click Always.
  3. You will now see a window showing download progress for the Pulse Secure app.
  4. The next window you see will ask for your administrator credentials. Enter your username and password, then click OK.

Step 9

  1. When the download reaches a certain point, you will see a number of popups. Click on the window that says “System Extension Blocked,” and select Open Security Preferences.
  2. The System Preferences app will open. Click on the System Preferences window to bring it to the front, then click Allow in the bottom half of the window to the right of the text “System software from developer ‘Pulse Secure LLC’ was blocked from loading.”
    • If Allow is greyed-out, click the padlock in the bottom left corner and sign in with your administrator credentials. Now you can click Allow.

  1. Close System Preferences. You will now see some other windows.
    1. In the window that starts with “PulseSetupClient,” click OK. This window may appear again multiple times. Click OK each time.
    2. In the window that says “System Policy is preventing loading PulseSecure,” click OK.
    3. When the window named “Setup: Pulse Secure” finishes installing the application, it will close.

Step 10: Using Pulse Secure

When Pulse Secure is finished installing, it should connect automatically. In your menu bar, you will see its “S” icon, along with a green arrow:

If Pulse Secure is installed, but not connected, you will see the same “S” icon, but with green inside the “S” and  no arrow:

If you click on either version of these icons, you will get a menu giving you connection options and the option to open the Pulse Secure app.

If you ever don’t see the Pulse Secure icon in the menu bar, you can open the app by typing “pulse secure” into Spotlight Search (the magnifying glass in the far right of the menu bar).

Departing Faculty and Staff

When a faculty or staff member leaves Bryn Mawr College, access to a variety of College accounts and services changes. Please be mindful of the account access timelines as described in the documentation when moving data because LITS is unable to perform email or file restores in Office 365.

BIONIC

BIONIC access will end on your final day at the College. If you are a faculty member who is teaching courses the semester of your departure, then your BiONiC access will end 30 days after your date of your departure to allow you to submit grades.

Office 365: Email and OneDrive

You will lose access to your College Office 365 account (which includes email, calendars, OneDrive, and downloaded copies of Microsoft Office) on your final day at the College. If you are a faculty member who is teaching courses in the semester of your departure, you will retain access to your Office 365 account for 30 days after your date of departure.

You may want to set up an automatic reply that provides instructions to people who email you after your departure. Please note: for the first 30 days after you lose access to your account, it will be disabled but not deleted. During this time, senders will not receive an automatic reply unless you set one up. Only after the account is deleted will the sender receive an automated message indicating that the address they are writing to cannot be found.

Please back up any information you may want to keep and transfer ownership of shared OneDrive files to someone in your group if the file is still needed. You can find instructions for backing up your email account and OneDrive here: http://techdocs.blogs.brynmawr.edu/5691

If you have downloaded Microsoft Office from your College Office 365 account to your personal computer, you will be able to keep that copy of Microsoft Office but will need personally renew your subscription of Office 365 to reactivate Microsoft Office.

Moodle

You will lose access to Moodle on your final day at the College. If you are a faculty member who is teaching courses in the semester of your departure, then you will retain access for 30 days after your departure. Once you lose access to Moodle, you will no longer have access any of the files you have stored there. Please download and save any files you feel you may need in the future.

Note: All changes to account access are automatic and based on your departure date. LITS is not able to manually reopen any College accounts.

Network Storage

You will loose access to your personal and departmental network storage (H: and S: drives) on your last day at the College. If you are a departing faculty member teaching courses in the semester of your departure, you will retain access to your network storage for 30 days after your final day. Please back up any information you may need. You can access
these drives from off campus by visiting http://ingress.brynmawr.edu/

Data

Personal data from your College computer and H: drive can be backed up to an external hard drive, a flash drive, or an online data storage service. Please speak with your technician regarding which method is best for you. Before you back up any personal data you wish to keep, discuss with your department to make sure they have any information
they’ll need from the account.

Note: Some data may be subject to legal & ethical restraints and may be a violation to take with you. This data can include student/class data and data related to College processes. If you are unsure what information is permissible to take with you as you depart, please consult with your department and Human Resources and see the Data Handling
Policy at http://www.brynmawr.edu/computing/policies/DataHandlingPolicy.htm

Library Borrowing

All library borrowing privileges end on your final day at the College. If you are also a graduate of Bryn Mawr College, you may request alumni borrowing privileges on the Library web site here: https://brynmawr.wufoo.com/forms/borrowing-privileges/ More information about Bryn Mawr College borrowing policies can be found here: http://www.brynmawr.edu/library/BorrowingPolicies.html

Domain of One’s Own

Domain of One’s Own access will end on your final day at the College. For information on migrating your data, please see http://techdocs.blogs.brynmawr.edu/7430

Voicemail

After your departure, your voicemail is emptied and all settings are reset. The phone extension is then assigned to another employee.

Building Access

OneCard door access ends on your final day at the College. You will still have access to any public buildings on campus, but will not be able to access secured spaces.

See the Server Accounts and Access policy for more information.

Managing Access with Group Manager

Group Manager, available for download via Software Center on your College computer, is a tool used by some departments on campus to grant or remove access to network resources (like S: drive folders and printing). For instructions on how to use Group Manager, please see the document below. If you have questions about Group Manager or your department’s group usage, please contact the Help Desk via help@brynmawr.edu, 610-526-7440, lits.brynmawr.edu, or visit us on the 1st floor of Canaday Library.

Granting/Removing Access via Group Manager
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Syncing OneDrive With Your Computer

One of the most useful features of your Bryn Mawr College OneDrive is that you can use your College credentials to easily sync all or select folders on your College- or personally-owned computer. People with a lot of data on their computer may want to be selective about what to folders to sync. See the College’s Data Handling Policy for guidance on safely storing College data.

For a quick tour of OneDrive take a look at this video; a syncing how-to begins at 2:09.

OneDrive Basics Video (mobile-friendly version)

 

More information on how and why to use OneDrive

How to Sync: College-owned Computers

Windows 10

The OneDrive desktop app is pre-installed. Use the start menu to locate and open the program, then follow on-screen instructions to sign in and sync.

Mac (latest software package)

The OneDrive desktop app is pre-installed. Locate and open the program, then follow on-screen instructions to sign in and sync. Be sure to check the open at login box.

Windows 7

Begin by opening OneDrive in a web browser using the app launcher in Office 365. Click Sync and follow on-screen instructions to download the OneDrive app and sync.

Mac (older software packages)

Download OneDrive from Software Center and follow on-screen instructions to sign in and sync.

How to Sync: Personal Computers

Windows

Begin by opening OneDrive in a web browser using the app launcher in Office 365. Click Sync and follow on-screen instructions to download the OneDrive app and sync.

Mac

Download the OneDrive for Business app from Apple’s App Store, then follow on-screen instructions to sign in and sync.

Information on OneDrive for mobile devices